Tai Chi – Scientific Studies to Inspire Your A$$ to Move Slowly

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  Tai Chi versus brisk walking in elderly women

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/4/388.long

Outcomes:  A short style of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) was found to be an effective way to improve many fitness measures in elderly women over a 3-month period. TCC was also found to be significantly better than brisk walking in enhancing certain measures of fitness including lower extremity strength, balance and flexibility.

 

 Evaluation of the sustaining effects of Tai Chi Qigong in the sixth month in promoting psychosocial health in COPD patients: a single-blind, randomized controlled trial

The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3824309/

Outcomes: Tai Chi Qigong (TCQ) has sustaining effects in improving psychosocial health; it is also a useful and appropriate exercise for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

 

 Impact of Qigong on quality of life, pain and depressive symptoms in older adults admitted to an intermediate care rehabilitation unit: a randomized controlled trial

Hospital Sociosantari Pere Virgili, Barcelona, Spain

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24927783

Outcomes: According to our results, a structured Qigong intervention, together with usual care, might contribute to improve quality of life of patients admitted to a post-acute intermediate care rehabilitation unit, compared to usual care.

 

  Improving Sleep Quality in Older Adults with Moderate Sleep Complaints: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Tai Chi Chih

University of California, Los Angeles, USA

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2491506/

Outcomes: Tai Chi Chih can be considered a useful nonpharmacologic approach to improve sleep quality in older adults with moderate complaints and, thereby, has the potential to ameliorate sleep complaints possibly before syndromal insomnia develops.

 

 Research on psychoneuroimmunology: tai chi as a stress management approach for individuals with HIV disease

Integrating Wellness, Inc., Richmond, VA, USA and School of Nursing, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2211366/#R9

Outcomes: As a stress management strategy, tai chi may enhance one’s coping ability and potentially impact neuroendocrine responses and, ultimately, immune function. We investigated this mind–body intervention, along with two other intervention groups and a wait-listed control group, in a randomized clinical trial to discover its specific biopsychosocial effects in individuals living with various stages of HIV disease. This article focuses on the novel tai chi intervention and provides preintervention and postintervention

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